Effie Apostolou

Associate Professor
Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine

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Provided

Contact Information

Weill Cornell Medicine
Room 1520 Belfer Research Building, 413 East 69th Street
New York, NY 10021
p: (646) 962-6235

Effie Apostolou

Associate Professor
Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine

Expertise

Three-dimensional chromatin organization; transcriptional regulation; epigenetics; stem cell biology; induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming; cell-fate control

Current Research Interest

Delineating the complex epigenetic mechanisms that dictate cell-fate decisions as a means to discover safer and more efficient ways to rationally modulate cell identity for biomedical purposes; pursuing this research through dissecting the critical interplay among epigenetic marks, three-dimensional chromatin organization, and transcription either during maintenance of cell fate (self-renewal) or during transition to a new fate; using state-of-the-art genome-wide chromatin assays and powerful epigenetic engineering tools that enable generation and precise modulation of four-dimensional molecular road maps during cell cycle or cell-fate change

Distinction

National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award
Mark Foundation for Cancer Research Emerging Leader Award
Raymond and Beverly Sackler Research Scholar
Jane Coffin Childs Fund Fellow

Selected Publications

Pelham-Webb, Bobbie, Alexander Polyzos, Luke Wojenski, Andreas Kloetgen, Jiexi Li, Dafne Campigli Di Giammartino, Theodore Sakellaropoulos, et al. “H3K27ac Bookmarking Promotes Rapid Post-Mitotic Activation of the Pluripotent Stem Cell Program without Impacting 3D Chromatin Reorganization.” Molecular Cell 81, no. 8 (2021): 1732–1748.e8.

Campigli Di Giammartino, Dafne, Andreas Kloetgen, Alexander Polyzos, Yiyuan Liu, Daleum Kim, Dylan Murphy, Abderhman Abuhashem, et al. “KLF4 Is Involved in the Organization and Regulation of Pluripotency-Associated Three-Dimensional Enhancer Networks.” Nature Cell Biology 21 (2019): 1179–1190.

Cornell Research Website Article

A Cell's Identity Crisis