Ankur Singh

Assistant Professor
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering/Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

Contact Information

389 Kimball Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
p: (607) 255-2194

Ankur Singh

Assistant Professor
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering/Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

Expertise

Biomaterials; immuno-engineering; germinal centers; lymphomas; immunotherapy; inflammation; tissue engineering; cell adhesion; stem cell engineering

Current Research Interest

Functional living immune tissues that communicate dynamically with immune cells and manipulate their behavior; how immune cells undergo decision-making at the cellular, molecular, and epigenetic (chromatin) levels to protect humans from biological and chemical threats; multi-scale tissues to understand how protector immune cells convert to malignant cancer cells (lymphomas); immunotherapy; inflammation

Distinction

Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Career Development Award
Society for Biomaterials Young Investigator Award
National Science Foundation CAREER Award
Elsevier Biomaterials Outstanding Paper Award
Discover Magazine 100 Top Stories of 2015
Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Young Innovator Award

Selected Publications

Béguelin, Wendy, Martín A. Rivas, María T. Calvo Fernández, Matt Teater, Alberto Purwada, David Redmond, Hao Shen, Matt F. Challman, Olivier Elemento, Ankur Singh, and Ari M. Melnick. “EZH2 Enables Germinal Centre Formation through Epigenetic Silencing of CDKN1A and an Rb-E2F1 Feedback Loop.Nature Communications 8 (2017): 877.

Singh, Ankur, Shalu Suri, Ted Lee, Jamie M. Chilton, Marissa T. Cooke, Weiqiang Chen, Jianping Fu, Steven L. Stice, Hang Lu, Todd C. McDevitt, and Andrés J. García. “Adhesion Strength-Based, Label-Free Isolation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.Nature Methods 10 (2013), 438-444.

Cornell Research Website Article

Living Tissue Systems for Fighting Disease