Diversity and Inclusion

Radical Collaborations. Impactful Research. Positive Change.

At Cornell we believe in advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion. We in the Research Division are committed to these efforts and, where possible, are leading the way. We understand that world-class research requires a mind open to new ideas and discoveries. The drive to discover, to create, and to impact the world lives in every person. Systemic racism in the academy has made it difficult for some people to see themselves as an integral part of research communities. We are heartened by the resilience and persistence of individuals to overcome barriers and challenges, and we are determined to help create positive change.  

The Research Division at Cornell stands for diversity of thought and freedom to innovate. Our goal is for faculty, students, and staff to bring the diversity of backgrounds and experiences necessary for radical collaborations and impactful research. To be successful we must have a culture of inclusion, equity, collaboration, and change.

Our Leadership 

We, the leadership of the Research Division, affirm the Belonging at Cornell and the institutional initiatives led by the Office of the President. If you have seen, heard, or experienced bias, the leadership, staff, and members of the Research Division encourage you to take positive action.

Working Together. Making a Difference.

The Research Division values both individual differences and differences in perspective. We want each of our colleagues to feel heard and to feel that they belong. We support intellectual curiosity and curiosity about the experiences of others. As we work together, we can learn more about how to support each other.

Training Options:


The Research Division Belonging at Cornell Committee welcomes your participation. To learn more, contact Jamie Washburn.

Recent and Upcoming Events
2021 Kops Freedom of the Press Lecture

Nikole Hannah-Jones is the Pulitzer Prize-winning creator of the 1619 Project and a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine. She has spent her career investigating racial inequality and injustice, and her reporting has earned her the MacArthur Fellowship, known as the Genius grant, a Peabody Award, two George Polk Awards and the National Magazine Award three times. Hannah-Jones also earned the John Chancellor Award for Distinguished Journalism and was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists and the Newswomen's Club of New York. In 2020 she was inducted into the Society of American Historians and in 2021, into the North Carolina Media Hall of Fame. View the Cornell Calendar event.
When: Thursday, September 9, 5pm EDT
Where: Rhodes-Rawlings Auditorium, Klarman Hall (Available by Live Stream)

Micro-affirmations: Little Things that Make a Big Difference

Many of us have heard of micro-aggressions, actions that perpetuate the marginalization of certain groups. Presented by Reginald White, Senior Director of Human Resources for the Cornell Research Division, this lecture will discuss the antidote, micro-affirmations. Learn how actions which affirm our humanity can make a big difference
When: Tuesday, August 24, 2pm EDT
Zoom Linkhttps://cornell.zoom.us/j/95118815049?pwd=Zm53V09SaFVKRXhJc2dzT2dIOXh5Zz09 
Passcode: 030726

Celebration Conversations: Caribbean American Heritage

Celebration Conversations are spaces to celebrate the stories, accomplishments, cultures, and heritages of Cornell staff, centering on historically marginalized voices. These conversations provide opportunities to bring us closer together and create a better understanding of our colleagues at Cornell. We encourage all staff to attend to connect with each other, support their colleagues, and deepen everyone's sense of belonging at Cornell. Register in advance for this event.
When: Thursday, July 22, 12pm EDT

Bias Intervention

During this seminar, participants will learn about the key concepts of bias and bystander intervention. Participants will then learn about and incorporate strategies and considerations for intervening in bias incidents, including what to do when they commit or witness a bias at Cornell. This event is open to the Cornell community—registration required.
When: Wednesday, May 12, 2pm, EDT

Anti-Asian Bias Teach-In

The Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Presidential Advisor on Diversity and Equity Avery August, and Vice Provost for International Affairs Wendy Wolford have organized an anti-Asian bias teach-in to hear from the community about the depth of these issues and strategies for fighting the rising discrimination.
When: Friday, May 7, 12-2pm, EDT

Now That We Have a Verdict, What Next?

This roundtable discussion will examine key aspects of the Derek Chauvin trial; what the verdict means for the evolution of race in the law; and the role of organizations as catalysts for policy change and social impact in general.
When: Tuesday, April 27, 4:30–6pm EDT

ONEcomposer: Diversity in the World of Music Composition with Dara Taylor

The Cornell University Chorus, directed by Sarah Bowe, partners with ONEcomposer for a panel discussion with Dara Taylor about the need for diversity in the world of musical composition, and the action steps required to make the study of composition more welcoming to women and people of color.  The event is free and open to the public.
When: Sunday, April 11, 4pm EDT

Racism in America

The College of Arts and Sciences presents another event as part of their "Racism in America" yearlong series. Panelists will focus on the impact of racism on access to health care and health outcomes. The event is free and open to the public—registration required.
When: Monday, March 29, 7pm EDT

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To learn more about initiatives in the Research Division, please contact Reginald White, senior director of human resources for the Research Division.

rhw32@cornell.edu
(607) 255-7515

Announcements
New Field Research Safety Supplies

Many members of the Cornell community conduct some form of fieldwork – but the safety of individuals conducting that fieldwork can be compromised when they are not recognized as scientific researchers. These risks are even higher for individuals who identify as minorities based on race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, gender identity, and/or religion.

To help identify Cornell researchers at field sites, the Cornell Store now has safety vests as well as car magnets available for sale which can be ordered directly by your department/lab using single sign-on and an account number for purchase: