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"When I pause to consider the ambitious goals and outstanding achievements of the Cornell faculty, I am amazed by the scope of Cornell Research—the far-reaching goals of our researchers and scholars to bring long-term benefits to people around the globe, and their success in advancing fundamental knowledge, creating new technologies, and achieving breakthroughs.”

Robert A. Buhrman, Senior Vice Provost for Research

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Cornell University ranks fourteenth in research expenditures nationally. In New York State, Cornell ranks second.

Source: National Science Foundation, FY 2014.

FY, fiscal year

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Cornell Research total external funding (sponsored and government appropriated) has an increase of 5.3 percent over the past fiscal year. Federal funding for Cornell Research amounts to $440.8 million for FY 2015. Nonfederal sponsored research funding equals $192.1 million, increasing by16.7 percent.

Cornell’s top 10 disciplines in sponsored research expenditures for FY 2015 are as listed: medical sciences, multidisciplinary, biology, agriculture, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, electrical engineering, astronomy, and sociology.

Disciplines are defined by the National Science Foundation and are mapped at the department level. 

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The National Institutes of Health constitute the greatest majority of research expenditures from the United States Department of Health and Human Services in FY 2015. Cornell ranks fourth nationally in National Science Foundation dollars awarded to universities in FY 2015.

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Cornell’s endowed colleges include the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Architecture, Art and Planning, and NYC Tech; the Schools of Hotel Administration, Law, and Johnson School Graduate School of Management; and the Faculty of Computing and Information Science.

Contract Colleges include the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Human Ecology, Veterinary Medicine, and Industrial and Labor Relations.

Cornell’s medical college comprises Weill Cornell Medicine and Weill Cornell Graduate school of Medical Sciences in New York City and Weill Cornell Medicine in Qatar. 

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The Cornell faculty is at the forefront of making groundbreaking discoveries, inventing new technologies, breeding new plants and plant varieties, and garnering novel copyrights. In FY 2015, Cornell faculty disclosed 357 new innovations.

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Cornell’s FY 2015 patent applications total 301 United States and 244 international. Patents issued include the sum of 109 United States patents and 176 international patents.

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Startup companies based on Cornell technologies for FY 2015 range from nanotechnologies for cancer detection to high-performance battery materials. The startup companies are as listed: Androvia LifeSciences LLC, Apnostics LLC, ASY Health Inc., BrainWire Technologies LLC, Claymore Technologies Inc., Conamix Inc., Guangda Cooperation International Technology Center Company Ltd., Hemogenyx LLC, iCareDx Inc., Lumendi Ltd. Lumidyne Technologies, Nirenberg Neuroscience LLC, Sphaira Aneurysm Solutions Ltd., Waltz Networks Inc., and XyloCor Therapeutics Inc.

Licenses for FY 2015 include 64 for inventions, 47 for plants, and one copyright.

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These distinctions are markers of excellence and high achievement for Cornell’s senior and early-career faculty. Membership in one or more of the distinguished national academies is among the most prestigious honors for faculty. PECASE, a top distinction, recognizes outstanding talent among United States scientists and engineers just starting their careers. 

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For distinguished cancer research, Lewis C. Cantley, Cancer Biology in Medicine/Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medicine received the Wolf Prize in Medicine, Canada Gairdner Prize in Life Sciences, and the Association of American Cancer Institutes Distinguished Scientist Award during 2015 and early 2016.

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Valerie F. Reyna, Human Development, was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine in 2015. Reyna researches risk taking and decision making of people of all ages.

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John T. Lis, Molecular Biology and Genetics was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences in 2015. Lis is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, elected in 2013.

Cornell faculty members were also elected to the other distinguished national academies in 2015. 

N. David Mermin, Physics, was inducted into the American Philosophical Society. Joseph Y. Halpern, Computer Science; Paul L. McEuen, Physics; and Karl J. Niklas, School of Integrative Plant Science, were elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Philip Li-Fan Liu, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Michael J. Todd, Operations Research and Information Engineering, became members of the National Academy of Engineering.

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Hening Lin, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Olga Boudker, Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medicine, became 2015 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators.

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Lena Kourkoutis, Applied and Engineering Physics, and Kenong Xu, Horticulture, received Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a top honor for young scientists and engineers, in early 2016.

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Steven D. Tanksley, School of Integrative Plant Science, won the Japan Prize in early 2016 for pioneering genetic techniques essential to crop development, which revolutionized plant breeding.

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Sources: Cornell University Research Division; Cornell University Division of Financial Affairs, Sponsored Financial Services; National Science Foundation, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, Higher Education Research and Development Survey; National Science Foundation, Office of Budget, Finance, and Award Management

Cornell Research: Stats & Highlights FY 2016

"When I pause to consider the ambitious goals and outstanding achievements of the Cornell faculty, I am amazed by the scope of Cornell Research—the far-reaching goals of our researchers and scholars to bring long-term benefits to people around the globe, and their success in advancing fundamental knowledge, creating new technologies, and achieving breakthroughs.”

Robert A. Buhrman, Senior Vice Provost for Research